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The "Anthropology" of Design

06 Oct 2020  •  10 min read

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In this collection of articles, we uncover the fundamentals of design education and how it could transform for tomorrow. 

Are Singapore businesses just not creative enough?
Channel News Asia (2018)

Many associate creativity solely with the arts. In doing so, it overlooks its crucial importance for businesses and by extension, the country's economy. To enable workers and entrepreneurs in Singapore to compete internationally, its education system should go beyond science, technology, engineering and mathematics to encourage creativity and innovation. Read the article here.


Changing Design Education for the 21st Century
She Ji: The Journal of Design, Economics, and Innovation (2020)


Few designers occupy high-level positions within organisations and government — a sign that design education is struggling to keep up with the needs of the profession. Professors Michael W. Meyer and Don Norman look to the experience of engineering, medicine and business and suggest a new template for design education that is flexible, broad-based and informed by modern societal issues. Read the article here.


Design ≠ Art
DesignObserver (2020)


Legendary graphic designer Milton Glaser, who recently passed, firmly believed that design was not just an aesthetic tool. His clear-eyed distinction between design and art offers food for thought as we re-examine the fundamentals of design and what should be taught to the next generation. Read the article here.


The Importance of Design Education
Toptal (2019)


What do formal institutions bring to the education of a designer and are they still vital for the future? A defence of design schools and how they can be improved to meet the changing needs of the profession. Read the article here.


The Future of Design Education Is...
No Design Education

Inc Magazine (2017)


Our increasingly technology-driven world demands not just a new kind of designer but fresh ways of educating them beyond traditional design schools. Some new models include a curriculum involving in a range of disciplines and encouraging independent learning using resources created from the experience of industry professionals. Read article here.


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